Alan Jackson runs add about Jackie Lacey committing perjury to protect Steve Cooley and his union busting against ADDA

October 18, 2012

Alan Jackson runs add reporting Jackie Lacey’s perjury to protect her boss Steve Cooley

With nearly three weeks until the LA County District Attorney election Alan Jackson releases a much over due advertisement about Jackie Lacey committing perjury under oath to protect her boss Steve Cooley.  Anti-union animus runs rampant in the DAs office.  Cooley and Lacey will face their foes in federal court in early December.  The most recent anti-union animus occurred last week by Julie-Dixson Silva (county counsel to Steve Cooley) and Deputy DA Director Janet Moore who violated Judge Wright’s federal injunction ordering the elected DA Steve Cooley, his directors and manager to stop their anti-union behavior.  If they aren’t in contempt of court with their egregious comments who is?  An unfair labor complaint was filed by the ADDA’s AFSCME attorney Tris Carpenter. (read full complaint here)


Union Busting continues: Steve Cooley violates injunction, Jackie Lacey unable to control employees

October 15, 2012

Janet Moore and Julie-Dixon Silva lose control and engage in anti-union animus rants against the prosecutors union representative.

In the wake of the Los Angeles District Attorney’s race and union busting federal trial, anti-union animus continues. Jackie Lacey’s and Steve Cooley’s violation of a federal injunction is flagrant in the form of their manager Janet Moore and county counsel Julie-Dixon Silva.  

Steve Cooley and Jackie Lacey along with their directors and managers were ordered by federal judge Otis Wright, in the form of a federal injunction to stop harassing and intimidating members of the Association of Deputy District Attorneys, a certified prosecutors union.

ADDA/AFSCME attorney Tris Carpenter, represents DAs in matters such as grievance hearings and union issues, and Mr. Carpenter accompanied a young district attorney in a grievance hearing where the DA “reported sexual harassment, domestic violence, trespassing, and potential grand theft”.  Read Unfair Labor Practices complaint here. Director Janet Moore along with wannabe judge, but thankfully not appointed by Governor Brown, Julie-Dixon Silva, both flew into a rage and began their rant of anti-union remarks and explicative vocabulary unbecoming of ladies, district attorneys and managers. Janet Moore was previously named in the anti-union federal law suit set for trial in early December.  Moore was unfortunately dropped from the law suit for unknown reasons.

With language fit for a sailor, Moore reportedly screamed at the union representative Tris Carpenter calling him a “paid Lackey whose only existence was to draw a salary from the dues paid by the members of the union”.  She told Mr. Carpenter to “get the f*** out of my office”, but that the district attorney filing their grievance could stay.  Moore violated the federal injunction, ERO 5.04.070 and ERO 5.04.240 by restraining and coercing employees from exercising their rights avail themselves of union representation and file grievances when they are mistreated.

Moore and Silva committed unfair employee relations practices and could be held in contempt of federal court.  Inside sources say this is only one of many flagrant violations that have existed over the past year since the injunction was filed. Meanwhile, Jackie Lacey has been seen around town at debates and fundraisers bragging about her abilities as a manager.  It seems her ability to manage Julie-Dixon Silva and Janet Moore are only part of Jackie Lacey’s problems as she enters into the District Attorney’s election and federal court where she will face perjury allegations.


Will the board of Supervisors ever pay up for Steve Cooley’s and Friends Union Busting?

January 26, 2012

Back in October Marc Debbaudt and the Association of Deputy District Attorneys were awarded $450,000 and $157,000 respectively in damages to pay for attorneys fees and compensation for harming the ADDA and Debbaudt’s  career when Steve Cooley settled those two portions of the federal law suit for union busting.  Cooley is represented by Jones Day and has racked up millions in dollars in attorneys fees at the expense of the tax payers.  Cooley  has refused to settle the portion of the law suit with regards to the former ADDA President Steve Ipsen and current ADDA President Hyatt Seligman.  Clearly the cases brought about by Debbeaut and the ADDA were so egregious that even Jones Day couldn’t defend Cooley’s shenanigans.  

The Board of Supervisors is said to have approved payment to the ADDA and union member Marc Debbeaut for damages. But, no one is exactly sure what happened in this closed session (aka. secret) meeting.

Inside sources reveal that the Board of Supervisors approved payment for the damages, but the ADDA and Marc Debbaudt have yet to receive payment.  The trial for Steve Ipsen and Hyatt Seligman was supposed to begin this month, but postponed until June.  If the Board of Supervisors were planning on delaying payment to see if Ipsen and Seligman won their trials, they could refuse to pay in the event Ipsen and Seligman lost.  That would send Debbaudt back to court.  Will the Board of Supervisors delay payment to the ADDA and Marc Debbaudt for six more months?  That has yet to be determined.


L.A. County settles part of suit alleging anti-union conduct

October 6, 2011
Steve Cooley’s Anti-Union Conduct
By Jack Leonard, Los Angeles Times
October 5, 2011
 
Los Angeles County will pay $575,000 to settle part of a federal law suit claiming that Dist. Atty. Steve Cooley and his managers waged an anti-union campaign, according to a settlement agreement filed in court. The settlement, which must be approved by the Board of Supervisors, would pay $125,000 to the prosecutors’ union and $450,000 to Deputy Dist. Atty. Marc Debbaudt, who a county employment commission found was transferred in retaliation for his union activity. In addition, a preliminary federal injunction ordering Cooley and other county officials not to discipline or discriminate against prosecutors for belonging to the union would remain in effect for the rest of Cooley’s tenure as D.A. Cooley has announced he will retire next year at the end of his third term.Matthew Monforton, an attorney representing the Assn. of Deputy District Attorneys, hailed the settlement as a victory for the union and described Cooley’s conduct as “outrageous and illegal.”Earlier this year, the county’s Employee Relations Commission upheld the findings of a hearing officer who concluded that veteran prosecutors were transferred to less desirable assignments as a result of their union work. Debbaudt, who joined the office in 1986, was sent from handling adult felony cases in Pasadena to working on juvenile matters in Pomona and then Sylmar, assignments usually given to less experienced attorneys. The hearing officer found that Cooley gave explanations that “were false and clearly pretexts” for conducting a “deliberate and thinly disguised campaign” aimed at destroying the union.Debbaudt and Cooley declined to comment on the settlement.Attorney Brian Hershman, a partner at the law firm Jones Day who represents the county, disputed the commission’s findings and said no prosecutors were retaliated against.He said the county settled the case to end what had become a distraction to the mission of the district attorney’s office. “We wanted to put that dispute behind us,” he said.Claims by two other prosecutors who are part of the lawsuit are scheduled for trial next month, Hershman said.

jack.leonard@latimes.com